an imageAuthor J. Stewart Dixon invites you to discover the "what" of awakening  in his new book 21 Days, A Guide for Spiritual Beginners.  What is awakening really like on an hourly, daily basis?:  Find out for yourself as he shares with you the most intimate details of ordinary life as lived in a most extraordinary way.  

21 Days is a very personal and intimate look at that little magic something found in all of us.

21 Days will be available early November 2012.



Often, in todays spiritual market place, there is a lack of clear and logical communication about the actual daily benefits of Awakening.  Teachers such as Adyashanti, Eckhart Tolle', Gangaji, or Andrew Cohen may tell you how, or reveal to you when, where, who or even why,  but few reveal the actual, intimate, and extra-ordinary daily what.  

What is it like when you have a family to care for and a business to run, when you're AWAKE?  What is it like when you're visiting your parents, your old high school, or your church, when you're AWAKE?  ...TV?  ...Fly-Fishing?  ...Movies?

These questions and more are answered in J. Stewart Dixon's book,
21 Days, A Guide for Spiritual Beginners.  Written with no spiritual, religious, new age, or psychological jargon, 21 Days communicates the what of spiritual awakening without the use of complicated or specialized 
language.  And of course this book includes a little
how.

 If you're new to spirituality,
21 Days should be among your first books.  If you've been seeking awakening for a long time- read 21 Days to readjust the WHAT of your seeking and put an end to your search.

I’ve tried to describe these experiences in a very plain and simple fashion, without technical, religious, spiritual, or psychological jargon; hopefully creating a book that is both friendly and comprehensible—one you’d happily lend to a friend without hesitation or fear of embarrassment.
What it actually feels like is this: From my head to my toes, for good stretches of the day, I am pervaded by a sense of peace, equanimity, and contentment that has no experiential match. I just call it "magic something".